CLINICAL SKILLS

station

GENERAL

EXAMINATION

General physical examination is an important clinical skill. During case presentation a fluent and prudent clinical examination, including assessment of airway, vascular access, spine examination and regional examination (when a peripheral nerve or plexus block is contemplated) can help the candidate to impress the examiner and confidently proceed to relevant systemic examination and anesthesia management.

 

AIRWAY 

EXAMINATION

WHAT ANESTHESIOLOGIST CAN'T MISS OUT

The airway assessment is of paramount importance, as this skill defines the anesthesiologist's preparedness.

 

CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM EXAMINATION

Examination of CVS involves a sequential and orderly examination. Examination of the arterial and venous pulses, the blood pressure and the precordium (inspection, palpation, percussion) should precede auscultation.

 

RESPIRATORY

SYSTEM

EXAMINATION

The key components include examination of the Upper Respiratory Tract and examination of the chest.

GASTROINTESTINAL

SYSTEM

In addition to the points in general examination, mention (only if present) signs of chronic liver disease or liver failure.

 
 

CENTRAL

NERVOUS

SYSTEM

The proper neurological examination is very much demanding and tedious. As anesthesiologists, we need to be familiar with all the clinical examination skills. However, for the board exam purpose, a candidate is expected to perform relevant tests and present in an orderly manner.

 

LARYNGOSCOPY

PROCEDURE

Direct laryngoscopy displaces the pharyngeal soft tissues to create a direct line of vision from the mouth to the glottic opening. Adequate glottic exposure during laryngoscopy often depends on the correct patient positioning.

 
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Anesthesia machine checkout

This is also known as "Cockpit drill". This very essential skill can be mastered only by routine practice. Follow the link to get the checklist for DATEX OHMEDA “AESTIVA 5"

INTRAVENOUS

CANNULATION

Intravenous (IV) cannulation is a technique in which a cannula is placed inside a vein to provide venousaccess. Venous access allows sampling of blood, as well as administration of fluids, medications, parenteral nutrition, chemotherapy, and blood products.